Monday, December 11, 2017
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Murasaki-imo
Murasaki-imo Not bad first harvest. rok-vegetables
Murasaki-imo
Murasaki-imo Murasaki-imo are a rare variation of the popular Satsuma-imo in Japan. Grown mostly in Southwest Japan and Okinawa, the only difference is that the Murasaki-imo are this brilliant purple. Related to the American sweet potato, these are a little softer and milder sweet flavor, making a versatile addition to many dishes. rok-vegetables
Sato Imo (Taro) Roots
Sato Imo (Taro) Roots If amino acids can naturally increase beneficial microbes to up to double your root mass, like these Taro (Satoimo) roots, just imagine what they can do for your roots and harvest. rok-vegetables
Taro
Taro "Satoimo" Fed only a little Be-1, compared with typical plants, this bunch of sweet taro from a Japanese farmer has about three times the number of baby tubers, also called "Keiki" in Hawaiian. rok-roots rok-vegetables
Taro
Taro "Satoimo" Taro is found all over Polynesia and Asia. In Japan, these fiber-rich corms are called "Satoimo," which means "sweet taro" and is usually broiled. Watch out, they can be a bit slimy. rok-roots rok-vegetables
Taro
Taro "Satoimo" A member of the Araceae family, Taro ("Kalo" in Hawaiian) plants are probably best known for the purple and creamy "poi," an ancient and important staple for Hawaiians. Poi is made in traditional underground ovens and pounded into a paste, adding water for consistency and served. See more from Hawaii Seed. They are a great promoter of non-GMO farmed taro throughout the islands. http://www.hawaiiseed.org/local-issues/taro/ rok-roots rok-vegetables
Taro
Taro "Satoimo" rok-roots rok-vegetables
Potatoes
Potatoes rok-vegetables